Brandon Roberts
Published © GPL3+

Particle Mesh - Xenon - LED Blink Duo

A walkthrough for setting up Particle Mesh and working with Argon, Xenon, and Boron and showing off some of the cool things you can do.

EasyFull instructions provided30 minutes295
Particle Mesh - Xenon - LED Blink Duo

Things used in this project

Hardware components

Xenon
Particle Xenon
×1
Argon
Particle Argon
×1
LED (generic)
LED (generic)
×2
Resistor 220 ohm
Resistor 220 ohm
×2

Software apps and online services

Particle Build Web IDE
Particle Build Web IDE
Visual Studio Code - Particle Workbench Extension
Particle App - Android
Particle App - iOS

Story

Read more

Schematics

Particle Mesh - Xenon - Blink LED

Code

Blink an LED

C/C++
// First, we're going to make some variables.
// This is our "shorthand" that we'll use throughout the program:

int led1 = D0; // Instead of writing D0 over and over again, we'll write led1
// You'll need to wire an LED to this one to see it blink.

int led2 = D7; // Instead of writing D7 over and over again, we'll write led2
// This one is the little blue LED on your board. On the Photon it is next to D7, and on the Core it is next to the USB jack.

// Having declared these variables, let's move on to the setup function.
// The setup function is a standard part of any microcontroller program.
// It runs only once when the device boots up or is reset.

void setup() {

  // We are going to tell our device that D0 and D7 (which we named led1 and led2 respectively) are going to be output
  // (That means that we will be sending voltage to them, rather than monitoring voltage that comes from them)

  // It's important you do this here, inside the setup() function rather than outside it or in the loop function.

  pinMode(led1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(led2, OUTPUT);

}

// Next we have the loop function, the other essential part of a microcontroller program.
// This routine gets repeated over and over, as quickly as possible and as many times as possible, after the setup function is called.
// Note: Code that blocks for too long (like more than 5 seconds), can make weird things happen (like dropping the network connection).  The built-in delay function shown below safely interleaves required background activity, so arbitrarily long delays can safely be done if you need them.

void loop() {
  // To blink the LED, first we'll turn it on...
  digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(led2, HIGH);

  // We'll leave it on for 1 second...
  delay(1000);

  // Then we'll turn it off...
  digitalWrite(led1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(led2, LOW);

  // Wait 1 second...
  delay(1000);

  // And repeat!
}

Credits

Brandon Roberts

Brandon Roberts

13 projects • 50 followers

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